Pro Shot Cleaning Rod Review

Pro Shot Cleaning Rod Review

Produced by Pro-Shot, the Pro-Shot cleaning rods are made with American-grade stainless steel. A finished Pro-Shot cleaning rod has a jeweled mirror-like finish. Due to the extra steps added to the manufacturing processes, a Pro-Shot rod is more hardened and dense than a conventional rod. However, barrel steel is still slightly more hardened than it. In addition to the polishing steps and centerless grind, the rods are handcrafted meticulously and micro-polished. 

The Pro-Shot cleaning rod has a working length of 36″. The jeweled mirror-like finish of the rod prevents it from attracting and carrying grit, fouling, and other types of abrasive specks of dirt through the bore. Widely used by accuracy-minded shooters around the world, these cleaning rods are built to be durable. Click here to purchase.

Features And Details 

  • Made with stainless steel that’s micro-polished with precision 
  • Has a proprietary rod handle design. This allows the rotation of the rod in the handle, letting the bore brush coil with the rifling. It also allows the complete cleaning of the grooves of the rifling. 
  • Features threading system with rugged precision. This is to ensure that the attachment of the rod accessories does not wobble.
  • Does not need an adaptor 
  • A patch holder holds the one-piece rods. The .17 and .20 Cal. rods are packaged with .17 or .20 Cal. jags.
  • A recyclable storage tube is used to package all the one-piece rods. This is to make sure that they are stored safely.
Pros

• The cleaning rod is the appropriate length

• These are tough rods designed to not scratch your barrel 

Cons

• Quite pricey 

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

  • Can Cleaning Rod Damage Barrel?

Barrels are made of steel. Generally, cleaning rods are made with softer metal to prevent causing damage to the barrel. Although wood is a good substitute too, they stand a greater chance of breaking. Although barrels at built to be sturdy and durable, the cleaning rods should be used with care to prevent damage. 

However, avoid aluminum cleaning rods because they are soft enough to suck up fragments of steel. It goes on to turn these fragments into something more of a carbide ream. Certain steel rods are bad news, too. The trick lies in buying the appropriate stainless steel cleaning rod. Bear in mind also, that when an AR15 is cleaned without a chamber guide, the chamber throat can be damaged. The chamber throat is important for reliability and accuracy. 

  • Are Aluminium Cleaning Rods Bad?

When a good cleaning rod is used appropriately, be assured that your bore will be kept healthy and alive for a long time. When a good or bad cleaning rod is used in the wrong way, it will kill off your bore faster than pouring a sizable quantity of hydrochloric acid down the muzzle of the bore. The ideal material for a good cleaning rod is either coated in plastic or steel. A good cleaning rod has to be stiff enough to not bend during use. 

A cleaning rod that bends is prone to scraping against the rifling. You already know what that entails. The worst types of rods are aluminum and brass. Not only do they tend to bend out of shape permanently, but they are also soft enough to suck up fragments of steel. It goes on to turn these fragments into something more of a carbide ream. Also, avoid any type of jointed rod except the joints fit together effortlessly. 

  • Is A Bore Snake Better Than A Cleaning Rod?

Patches and a cleaning rod ensure that you get a deeper cleaning. Of course, this is at the expense of bigger size, spending more time, and possible damage to your weapon as time goes on. In most situations, bore snakes tend to do a relatively decent job of cleaning.

They are known to occupy space that’s far smaller than that occupied by cleaning rods. They also clean up faster. These benefits make bore snakes more desirable to pick any day and any time. Cleaning rods are still useful and preferred in certain situations. 

Weapons that have short barrels need to be cleaned deeply and thoroughly from time to time. A cleaning rod will offer you this more than a bore snake. To be sure of the ideal cleaning tool for you, make a stop at the local gun shop and seek the opinion of an expert. They’ll recommend the ideal cleaning tool for you based on the kind of firearm you own, frequency of use and cleaning, the cleaning tools you have already, and your budget.

  • Can A Bore Snake Damage A Barrel?

Bore snakes do not damage barrels. On the contrary, they are useful for cleaning guns before and after firing. They are used to wipe the insides of the barrel easily and get rid of any fouling or residue. Despite their numerous benefits, several gun owners do not like the idea of using bore snakes for cleaning guns. There’s a general belief that the bronze bore bristles are not so durable. 

Finally, it all boils down to what you prefer and your ability to handle and maintain your gun cleaning equipment well enough. Not only do bore snakes save you a lot of time on cleaning, but they are also convenient to use. However, it is not recommended for use if you have debris such as dirt and sand stuck inside your barrel. This is the majority of the bore snakes can’t get rid of big sizes of debris stuck inside a gun barrel.

  • Should I Use Oil Inside A Gun Barrel?

Guns do not come cheap. Just like every other mechanical device, their functionality and lifespan are largely dependent on regular cleaning, maintenance, and lubrication. The barrel of every gun ought to be oiled. It’s safe. 

It is a good idea to leave a light coat of oil in the barrel of your gun before you put it away for storage. Run one or two dry patches through the barrel of the gun to get rid of the oil when you are ready to shoot after lubrication and putting away. 

  • How Often Should I Clean My Gun?
You need to have a clear understanding of the importance of cleaning guns, to be able to answer how often guns should be cleaned. Let’s look at the mechanism behind the firing of a gun. The primer in the ammunition cartridge is lit up every time you fire a gun. The ammunition cartridge, in turn, gives off a flame that lights up the gunpowder.
The burning of the gunpowder leaves a little gunpowder ash residue behind inside the gun barrel, just like the fire from a log. Traces of gunpowder ash can also be found in the frame, slide, or internal parts of the gun. Bullet metal in a little quantity is scratched on the bore when the bullet uses the action of expanding gases to go down the barrel.
The bullet metal scratched on the bore is usually either lead or copper. As a result of repeated firings, more is deposited on the bore. 

When you fail to clean the metal scraps out regularly, there will be a build-up of metal inside the bore. As time goes on, the accuracy and reliability of the gun begin to diminish. The burning of gunpowder generates and leaves a build-up of black mass that coats the moving parts of the gun, preventing it from functioning properly.

At the end of every shooting session, firearms should be cleaned lightly but thoroughly to clean out the build-up of metal. 

After cleaning, apply light gun oil or lubricant in small quantity to the gun surfaces that rub together. The rails between the frame and slide of a semi-auto and the hinges between a revolver’s cylinder and frame are included in this category. To prevent rust, swab the bore with a very light coat of oil.

When you apply too much oil on your gun, it leaves an oily cloud on it when next you bring it out for use. After oiling the necessary parts, wipe off the excess lubricant to avoid leaving an oily cloud behind.

Conclusion 

The Pro-Shot cleaning brand built the cleaning rods to clean out the insides of a gun effectively. Built to be durable and used by accuracy-minded shooters, the cleaning rod is widely recognized and accepted across the world. The Pro-Shot cleaning rod has a working length of 36″. The jeweled mirror-like finish of the rod prevents it from attracting and carrying grit, fouling, and other types of abrasive specks of dirt through the bore. 

Due to the extra steps added to the manufacturing processes, a Pro-Shot rod is more hardened and dense than a conventional rod. A finished Pro-Shot cleaning rod has a jeweled mirror-like finish. In addition to the polishing steps and centerless grind, the rods are handcrafted meticulously and micro-polished.

To top it all, the cleaning rods are contained in a durable, stiff, and clear protective storage tube with a cap. Not only are the Pro-Shot cleaning rods well made and have an aesthetic appearance, but they are also worth every penny spent on them.

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